The Black Guy Who Tips

A Free Comedy Talk Show With the Motto - Nothing's Wrong If It's Funny

672: We Are Against Rape and Murder

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Rod and Karen are joined by actress Lilly Allen to discuss acting in her new play Closer, Noah, The Rock, actors on set and their rules, the #CancelColbert campaign and sign up for healthcare by tomorrow. No guess the race or sword ratchetness this show.

Twitter: @rodimusprime @SayDatAgain @TBGWT @TheLillyNelson
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Blog: www.theblackguywhotips.com
Voice Mail: 704-557-0186

Guest Website: http://www.lillynelsonactress.com/
Tickets for Closer: http://burningcoal.org/closer/

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1 Comment

  1. In regards to behavior/interactions between talent and background actors on set, in my experience, Karen is more on target (at least for California productions). These limitations are mostly dictated by the studio and/or the director. It’s not really about protecting the talent, it’s about union regulations and managing time/money. Shooting time is very expensive. Mostly everyone involved is union and if they go over, the cost (and penalties) can be severe. They try to keep shooting going until forced to stop. It’s the production assistants who are cracking the whip at both talent (with limits) and background.

    I am not saying that there are not some talent out there who are full of shit. There is always the occasion we get a “celebrity” on set who is feeling themselves. Most are very open and engaging. But they know they are at work and that is the priority. A production set is like any other work space. The talent is on the clock just like everyone else. What could look like downtime may actually be preparation for the next scene. So if they don’t want to talk at the moment, it’s not personal.

    As for celebrity riders, most talent isn’t even involved in that process. It’s usually the assistants/managers. They’re the ones sitting in the room eating the green M&Ms and sipping on Cristal while the talent is working. They claim they do it to make sure the venue read the rider. Yeah, whateva. The talent is barely in the room, they arrive in time for hair/makeup and they leave right after wrap. The talent will usually grab something off craft services like everyone else.

    This has been my observations on L.A. sets. Things could be different in other production areas.

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